Skip to content
Worth the wait: 'I'm very, very happy'. Pic: Andymurray.com
Andy Murray
Update by news editor   11-09-2012

Murray wins US Open

Scottish star makes history with grand slam title

Andy Murray has made sporting history by winning the US Open tennis championship. He is the first British man for 76 years to win a grand slam title!

The Scot beat the Serbian defending champion Novak Djokovic in five sets: 7-6, 7-5, 2-6, 3-6, 6-2 in the Arthur Ashe Stadium in Flushing Meadows, USA.

"I'm very, very happy, and I hope I can see another British player in my lifetime win a grand slam," he said.

Andy fulfilled his dream of becoming a major champion just 36 days after winning gold in the men's singles in the Olympics.

Cheered on by the acting legend Sean Connery and Manchester United manager Sir Alex Ferguson, the 25-year-old won in a match which lasted four hours and 54 minutes.

In preparation for the big game, Murray watched the film Wedding Crashers and played Scrabble. His approach paid off when he took the final set 6-2 to win his first grand slam.

Novak Djokovic paid tribute to the new champion after the match. "I had a great opponent," he said. "He deserved to win this grand slam more than anybody because over the years he has been a top player.

Fred Perry was the last British man to win a major tennis title in 1936. He won his first big tournament on the very same date in 1933 after winning Olympic gold!

Virginia Wade was the last British woman to hold such a title, having won Wimbledon in 1977.

Join us LIVE on Glow TV - Tune in this Friday 14 September to speak live to two Olympic canoeists - gold medal winner Tim Baillie AND double silver medallist David Florence! Sign up here.

Click here to try our Andy Murray quiz

Lesson ideas and suggestions

Join the Daily What News Facebook group

Murray wins US Open

What does it take to become a grand slam winner?

How would you like to play tennis for nearly five hours a day, plus do an hour's general fitness training?  What about having to stay in school until 8pm to fit in your school work?  Fancy leaving your family and friends at the age of 15 to move to a foreign country, so you can train with the best coaches?

This is exactly what Andy Murray did when he was a teenager.  He's reaping the rewards now, having just won the US open and become the first British man to win a grand slam title for 76 years.

Murray started playing tennis when he was three years old and played in his first tournament when he was five.

Leon Smith, the sport star's coach from the age of 11, says he had never seen a child like Murray.  "He was unbelievably competitive.  We used to play short tennis, and he wanted to win every point."

Roger Draper, the chief executive of the Lawn Tennis Association (LTA), believes that Murray inspires young sporting hopefuls throughout Scotland.

"Kids look at Andy and think if he can do it … and he comes from Dunblane, then there's no reason I can't do it."

Draper's theory will be put to the test in the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Glasgow, when tennis will feature as an event for just the second time.  Do you have the talent, but maybe more importantly, the dedication to get to the podium in four years time?

The LTA prescribes 12 hours of tennis a week for 12-year-old boys.  The advice for boys is to play more hours than your age if you are over 12, but less if you are under 12.  Girls can train for longer, from an earlier age - 10 hours a week for 10-year-olds, and more hours than your age if you are over 10.

And that's not all.  Young players should also fit in lots of other sports and up to five fitness sessions a week!  This is all before you even get to a tournament - the summer season lasts from April until September.

Parents' blogs on the LTA site talk of 10-year-olds who have already left school to train full time at special academies, and travel hundreds of miles at the weekends to take part in competitions.

Even after all that hard work, champions like Andy Murray still suffer in big matches.

"Physically it's challenging," Andy said after the game. "It is something I have never done before. I am just so relieved, like I said, to finally have got through and can put this one behind me and hopefully win more."

 

Join us LIVE on Glow TV - Tune in this Friday 14 September to speak live to two Olympic canoeists - gold medal winner Tim Baillie AND double silver medallist David Florence! Sign up here.

Click here to try our Andy Murray quiz

Lesson ideas and suggestions

Join the Daily What News Facebook group

adapted from article by Martin Williams

Experiences & Outcomes

  • I am developing my understanding of the human body and can use this knowledge to maintain and improve my wellbeing and health. HWB 2-15a / HWB 3-15a / HWB 4-15a
  • I have investigated the role of sport and the opportunities it may offer me. I am able to access opportunities for participation in sport and the development of my performance in my place of learning and beyond. HWB 2-26a / HWB 3-26a
  • I can explain the role of sport in cultural heritage and have explored the opportunities available for me to participate in school sport and sporting events. I make use of participation and performance pathways that allow me to continue and extend my sporting experience in my place of learning and beyond. HWB 4-26a